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Santo Domingo.- Two international institutions yesterday announced a US$100 million joint investment in Inter-Energy Holdings (IEH), to develop cleaner and efficient sources of energy in the Caribbean and expand its operations in Latin America.

Investors are IFC, a member of the World Bank Group and the Fund for Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean (ALAC) of the IFC. Each will contribute US$ 50 million in capital to IEH, a company focused on the energy sector in Latin America and the Caribbean, and one of Dominican Republic’s leading investors in electricity generation, transmission and distribution.

"The capital investment by IFC and the ALAC Fund, is a natural evolution of our partnership for many years with IFC, which has previously funded companies in our group," said Rolando Gonzalez Bunster CEO of IEH.

He said they work to achieve production of secure, efficient and clean energy in the country, and "we plan to participate directly in the development of solutions for the energy sector in Haiti, thereby facilitating economic development on the island."

Quoted by diariolibre.com, Gonzalez Bunster said investments of IFC and ALAC Fund allow IEH to expand and improve its existing operations and develop new projects to diversify Dominican Republic’s energy matrix, thus reducing the country’s dependence on oil to generate power.

He added that the investments are expected to generate savings in fuel costs by increasing the capacity to import natural gas and develop renewable energy sources.

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COMMENTS
13 comment(s)
Written by: jasfalon, 22 Feb 2013 9:08 AM
From: United States

Hope!
Written by: Mart1n, 22 Feb 2013 12:29 PM
From: Dominican Republic, North coast
The world bank getting it claws deeper in the pockets of Dominicans
Written by: RonEvane This user is banned, 22 Feb 2013 12:42 PM
From: United States, Gaithersburg, Maryland

"He added that the investments are expected to generate savings in fuel costs by increasing the capacity to import natural gas and develop renewable energy sources."

Importing natural gas isn't the way to "generate savings in fuel costs". The way to go is to "develop renewable energy sources".
Research and development in methane digester, using poop and organic matter, can significantly reduce imports of petroleum derivatives.
Also, any new government housing projects, school buildings, etc. Can be fitted with solar panels to reduce electricity demands.
These are the many small steps taken, that in conjunction, can reduce and almost eliminate using precious imported fuels to power our future.
Written by: anthonyC, 22 Feb 2013 1:52 PM
From: United States


Just more Cronyism. Once again it is the Productive Tax payers who gets screwed.



Written by: juanb, 22 Feb 2013 2:09 PM
From: Dominican Republic



Sounds like a good day for new car dealers.
Written by: dreadlocks, 22 Feb 2013 2:52 PM
From: United States
says anthonyc

Written by: anthonyC, 22 Feb 2013 1:52 PM
From: United States


Just more Cronyism. Once again it is the Productive Tax payers who gets screwed.

why don't you go to school some day, and learn to read? when you learn to read, why don't you learn reading comprehension? this is a private venture. you should try to say something intelligent some day. trust me, it will not hurt.,
Written by: RonEvane This user is banned, 23 Feb 2013 4:08 PM
From: United States, Gaithersburg, Maryland

The sun and the toilet can help a great deal in reducing energy demands from utilities.
When I finally get the heck out of Maryland, I will retrofit our home in SD with photovoltaic panels that, along with my genius brother, will build ourselves from readily available parts sold at hardware stores.

We will, just for the fun of it, and as an exercise in the process to gain experience, also build a methane digester and, naturally, a solar hot-water heater.

Along with our cousin, the accountant, we made some calculations as to the costs of these projects.
To my surprise, materials needed don't amount to more than one thousand dollars.
These are very simple projects, that anyone with a little common sense, can put together...or so, I think.
I won't know for sure until we get into working on them. Regardless, it'll be fun.... We'll see what happens.
Written by: RoyStone, 25 Feb 2013 5:29 AM
From: Australia
"These are very simple projects, that anyone with a little common sense, can put together"
Really?
You have been talking about it for years and still not done anything?

Written by: RonEvane This user is banned, 25 Feb 2013 10:10 AM
From: United States, Gaithersburg, Maryland

I'm the catalyst. The one with the radical ideas, and necessary funds.Nothing gets done unless I'm physically there.
Written by: RoyStone, 25 Feb 2013 6:58 PM
From: Australia
Harnessing methane from anaerobic digestion of effluent is not a "radical idea" - Melbourne's SE Purification Plant has been doing it since 1975. We have yet to see your figures on how it can be viable at the household level.
Written by: RonEvane This user is banned, 25 Feb 2013 8:22 PM
From: United States, Gaithersburg, Maryland

It's an-aerobic digestion, Roy. Not "aerobic"...." In the absence of oxygen."

I think I've already presented ample evidence of the functionality and practicality of digesters.
China and India, for years, have demonstrated the feasability and conveniece of this simple technology.

A "purification" and a" digester" plant are two different things. One extracts Methane in the absence of oxygen, the other uses aerobic (oxygenated), bacteria to break down matter and render it inert.
We get no useful gas from the latter.
Find out which type Melbourne is using. You may be confusing one for the other.
Written by: RoyStone, 25 Feb 2013 8:48 PM
From: Australia
It's an-aerobic digestion, Roy. Not "aerobic"...." In the absence of oxygen."

Absolutely correct, Ron and I've fixed my typo - nice to know you are on the ball.

The SE Purification plant uses both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The water produced is actually safe to drink, the methane used to power the plant, and the spent sludge as fertilizer.

This plant treats the Eastern half of Melbourne's sewerage. The Western half goes to the Werribee Sewerage Farm, another environmentally-sustainable bio-processing plant. It is one of the wintering sites of the critically-endangered orange-bellied parrot, which breeds in south-western Tasmania then migrates across Bass Strait every year.

Written by: RonEvane This user is banned, 25 Feb 2013 9:23 PM
From: United States, Gaithersburg, Maryland

"This plant treats the Eastern half of Melbourne's sewerage. The Western half goes to the Werribee Sewerage Farm".

This is another great example, Roy, of what can be done with sewage. Other than dumping it underground in aquifers, or into the sea. ..It can be channeled into large ponds where certain plants and algae will feed off of these nutrients and in turn, can be fodder for an amazing number of bird and animal species!

We humans are wasteful. We are wasteful because we are dumb. Dumb people die off. Evolution says so!
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