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Santo Doming.- Central banker Héctor Valdez Albizu on Thursday  said Dominican Republic’s economy grew 4.1% in 2013, “well above projections by agencies such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and ECLAC.”

He said that the growth resulted from fiscal and monetary policies combined.

Valdez predicts this year’s economic growth of around 5.5%, “very close to the economy’s potential and that’s very important since it puts us in a privileged position."

He said agriculture grew 4.4%; construction 7.3%; Free Zones 2.5%; hotels, bars and restaurants 6.3%, and financial services 10.5%.

The official said inflation was 3.88%; international net reserves topped US$4.7 billion while foreign investment totalled US$2.08 billion.

He called the country’s currency relatively stable while unemployment stood at 15%.

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COMMENTS
37 comment(s)
Written by: BASTA, 16 Jan 2014 1:40 PM
From: Dominican Republic, =Ghetto/Legalize Drugs/Free abortions for all Never Confuse Education with Intelligence
Really?
Written by: Radar, 16 Jan 2014 2:11 PM
From: Dominican Republic

If the electricity dearth ever gets resolved, our economy may reach unprecedented heights.
Our little nation has a geographical advantage that makes it ideal for shipping everywhere in the Atlantic, thus a great place for investments in the manufacturing of goods and food for export.

If Medina does half as much as he has done already, there's no telling how much we may prosper.

Written by: JHCL2016, 16 Jan 2014 2:14 PM
From: Dominican Republic, EN PUNTA CANA: Jose H Con Leonel 2016!

Yes, really! Thanks to the great volume of mud Haiti is importing from DR. Haiti bans chickens, eggs, others but really wants more mud!

Para que? No se...

( ';' )

*Cookie Monster*
Written by: Danilo, 16 Jan 2014 2:26 PM
From: Dominican Republic, SDQ --- VIGILADOR.COM (Beta) - Vigilando nuestra Quisqueya
Joseano and the gang of Haitians are fuming from this news.
Written by: dagtan, 16 Jan 2014 3:44 PM
From: United States, New York City
This is great news and we all know that the DR as I mentioned before has the natural resources and invest-ability to become a leading power player in the Caribbean, commanding great respect from the rest of the area as a result. However, the real devastating news is that the DR even though it has been growing steady for the lat 4-6 years, the education budget is stagnant, leading to one of the most illiterate population in the Caribbean. We are only doing better than Haiti in this area, even though our economy is far stronger than many of the smaller islands.

DR needs to wake and understand that a country's most precious resource is its HUMAN CAPITAL.
Written by: Radar, 16 Jan 2014 4:18 PM
From: Dominican Republic

Absolutely, dagtan.! I think the present government realizes this to be a problem of first magnitude, and is trying hard to better the educational standards.

It's sad to note that many of our school teachers, don't have the smarts to teach properly. There's an article in the news that reflect how poorly trained they are.

If it were up to me, I'd contract real, capable teachers from Cuba and/or Spain to come and teach our teachers how to teach.
Written by: dagtan, 16 Jan 2014 4:54 PM
From: United States, New York City
@Radar,
I agree with your assessment on the quality of our teachers. However, I will ask to look at the extremely expensive fees that they are currently charging teachers or future teachers in the DR to become certified. Teachers do not make much to begin with, on top of that DR has the highest fees in the entire area for teacher's certification tests and certificates.

As a result, many get out of the profession, tire with the corruption at the Ed Department and many do not even think about become one. Cuba has an excellent education system, but with flaws, which I will elaborate on later. Cuban invest around 3k per year per student, while the invest $420 per year, per student.

I believe that if the current government is serious about building human capital, we could be at 50% literacy rate by 2050 give or take.

These figures are subject to change i will say 500k plus or minus. I wish someone will conduct a quantitative study and giver us better numbers.
Written by: Radar, 16 Jan 2014 5:26 PM
From: Dominican Republic

No question that our educational system is in dire need of funding and to be totally reworked. Quality teachers aren't paid enough, and as you said, they get out of the profession altogether. the ones remaining, apparently, don't have the skills to teach or find other form of work.

This problem is manifold, with no easy solution. I don't think that just certifying and qualifying new, capable teachers, even if they're paid a reasonable salary, will undo the many years of neglect. We just couldn't do this fast enough.

The Medina gov is now beginning to address it, but hope that it won't take til 2050 to get us up to speed in this dpt. This is why we need to hire foreigners to get us going until we can fend for ourselves.
Written by: dagtan, 16 Jan 2014 6:09 PM
From: United States, New York City
@Radar,
Currently the DR has about 4 million students, in a country of about 13 millions give or take (counting the Haitian population, that is not in many ways allowed to attend school due migratory issues). 65-70% of the general population is illiterate, so we already have 15-20% of the general population that needs to be re-educated or educated.

Now the 4 millions currently going to school, lets say that 65-70% are not going to be become literate, that is another 2.4-2.8 million more people to re-educate or educate.

So we are talking about 2.8 plus 1.8 from the general population, because you can only do the math on about 9 million, since we already have 4 million in school. So that is about 4.6 to educate in the next 36 years.
Written by: Radar, 16 Jan 2014 6:35 PM
From: Dominican Republic

I can't say with any certainty that the number of illiterates number 65/70% That seems a little high, but then, you could be right.( I'll have to google it.)

Regardless of the numbers, if the money is there, and the govt is willing, we can certainly put a big dent on illiteracy.
I attended a mini course at a govt-funded program called INFOTEP, it's free to anyone and it has many programs available for learning, from engineering to massage classes. (I took the six-week massage course to satisfy my old beach)
There are other free school programs to be had. If one is willing, we can learn something. It's a matter of desire and time availability, I think.
Written by: dreadlocks, 16 Jan 2014 8:21 PM
From: United States
says Radar

If it were up to me, I'd contract real, capable teachers from Cuba and/or Spain to come and teach our teachers how to teach.

Spain? what are you going to pay them with? do you consider the peso to euro exchange rate when you say this?
Written by: DONT_BE_SILENT, 16 Jan 2014 8:28 PM
From: Dominican Republic, NEVER FORGOTTEN, NOR FORSAKEN!
Written by: dreadlocks, 16 Jan 2014 8:21 PM
From: United States
says Radar

If it were up to me, I'd contract real, capable teachers from Cuba and/or Spain to come and teach our teachers how to teach.

Spain? what are you going to pay them with? do you consider the peso to euro exchange rate when you say this?




I gues the Politicos are gonna have to buy less jippetas, so we can pay in Euro.
Written by: Radar, 16 Jan 2014 8:36 PM
From: Dominican Republic

Er..no. You're right, sir. It may be too steep a price to pay the Spaniards. But then, they're going through an economy crisis like they haven't in a long time. Perhaps they'd be willing take a cut if we give them "perks", whatever that may be.

On the other hand, the Cubans, If Castro allows it, may come cheap. No?
Written by: dreadlocks, 16 Jan 2014 8:42 PM
From: United States
Cuba has a shortage of qualified teachers, themselves. too many have been sent to other countries in the world.

the DR should have brought in foreign teachers when the peso was equal to the dollar. it is too late now.
Written by: DONT_BE_SILENT, 16 Jan 2014 8:54 PM
From: Dominican Republic, NEVER FORGOTTEN, NOR FORSAKEN!
It's never too late Einstein!
Written by: dreadlocks, 16 Jan 2014 10:46 PM
From: United States
says DONT BE SILENT

Written by: DONT_BE_SILENT, 16 Jan 2014 8:54 PM
From: Dominican Republic, Never forgotten, never forsaken. 168-13 IRREVOCABLE.
It's never too late Einstein!

think so? do you mean that you think that it is not too late for you to grow a brain?
Written by: Atabey, 16 Jan 2014 11:47 PM
From: United States, Bring DT Forum Back--


Dready,

You're right about Spain, and Cuba somewhat.

It's true that Cuba has experienced a short fall in overall quality due largely to their most capable teachers taking assignments aboard, but seriously, even the less qualified ones in Cuba would be better ON AVERAGE than the average teachers in the DR. I believe it was close to 60% of the teachers who failed to pass the current examination for certification!

And this teacher quality deficit, unless reversed, will surely make any investments in general education far less potent in its delivery and impact on the children.

The DR needs urgently to tackle this quality issue, ( I've often thought that with such large unemployed populations of educated youths in Spain, the government of Spain could send some of their unemployed teachers to the DR for short 2 year assignments. Of course, these individuals would still be receiving funds from the State and some extra wages from the DR.

Written by: Atabey, 16 Jan 2014 11:51 PM
From: United States, Bring DT Forum Back--



Combined with the small, but talented minority of teachers in DR, they would help cover the gap until better trained native staffing came into the pipeline.

Colombia, Costa Rica, Uruguay (?) could help.



Are Teachers Well Paid in Latin America and the Caribbean?” (Limarino, W.H. (2005).

thedialogue.org/PublicationFiles/Liang%2027-English.pdf

Teachers’ Salaries in Latin America: How Much Are They (Under or Over) Paid?
Alejandra Mizala
Universidad de Chile

Hugo Ñopo
Inter-American Development Bank and IZA

ftp.iza.org/dp5947.pdf


Written by: PuntaCanaMike, 17 Jan 2014 12:05 AM
From: Dominican Republic
"Yes, really! Thanks to the great volume of mud Haiti is importing from DR."

JHCL...who the hell built your buildings??? Hypocrite!!!
Written by: guillermone, 17 Jan 2014 12:11 AM
From: United States, Bring Back DT Forum
The DR needs urgently to tackle this quality issue, ( I've often thought that with such large unemployed populations of educated youths in Spain, the government of Spain could send some of their unemployed teachers to the DR for short 2 year assignments. Of course, these individuals would still be receiving funds from the State and some extra wages from the DR.

THESE ARE EXCELLENT IDEAS............!!!!!

And believe it or not the concept although original, is actually not necessarily new. The Dominican education system was once excellent when "La Escuela Normal" or teachers college was introduced by Pto Rican educator Eugenio Ma de Hostos. He helped develop the DR educational system and many high caliber professionals. I neither know nor understand what happened later and why it deteriorated so much. However, we must clarify that private education for the most part is relatively superior but far out of reach to the masses and why public education must be revamped with urgency
Written by: dreadlocks, 17 Jan 2014 12:19 AM
From: United States
Atabey, the average salary of a teacher in Spain is 2100 euro per month. that translates to 122, 850 pesos per month. let us say that we can get them to come here and work for 1000 euro; that would be around 60,000 pesos per month. what would we do about the salaries of the local teachers who earn 12,000 pesos per month? do you think that the teachers' union would allow that?
Written by: Atabey, 17 Jan 2014 12:36 AM
From: United States, Bring DT Forum Back--

Well Dready there are always problems. Remember, I said unemployed teachers.

And you could well extend it to any non-working but educated professional or University graduate that instead of waiting a few years for the economy to return to strength in Spain is willing to take a two year assignment and teach.

Both Spain and DR could reach some support level to entice some individuals to come for a short period.

Written by: guillermone, 17 Jan 2014 12:36 AM
From: United States, Bring Back DT Forum
I think what we need to bring just a few teachers of teachers for lets say a 4 or 5 year contract. But if we start bringing in only foreign teachers and pay them triple what the natives make there will be problems.

However, if we can arrange something with the Spanish gov't come up with some sort of a deal it might work. The Spaniards would love to live in the tropics and the change would be a good experience. Maybe they can continue to collect unemployment benefits plus a nominal salary or stipend, relocation costs, plus room and board, a plan like that might just work.

Another possible source of teachers is Mexico. It has an excellent educational system and they will be a lot cheaper than Spaniards. Mexicans already have a strong presence in the DR. I think if we recruit teachers from all over Latin America where there is a strong educational ethics it might work out very well. The countries included are Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Peru, Uruguay and Argentina.
Written by: danny00, 17 Jan 2014 5:39 AM
From: United States, blue mall santo domingo
The Haitians want the Mud and the Dominicans want and Love the Caca Salami.....They also love to Rob, Steal, Cheat like all good Dominicans Do.......at least to me it seems like the Haitians are Hard Working People while their Brothers and Sisters on the other side of the island sit around drinking their presidente and make babies with 10-11y old girls......u need to understand they can't or want a real women. even men 40-50y old who hold high office in their make believe Govt have girlfriends who are under 15y old.....Sad but all true these are the Losser of the world.....
Written by: danny00, 17 Jan 2014 5:45 AM
From: United States, blue mall santo domingo
No real teacher would live in this hell hole Guillermone u know that guy....just a few months ago they killed one teacher who was working over there....if any gringo tries and is still alive after 6 months in this shit-house the run to the airport and they don't look back...your life is in danger in this Wild West Country ...this guy Guillermone doesn't even live in this own country he's scared of the crime....Lol
Written by: Lautaro, 17 Jan 2014 7:00 AM
From: Dominican Republic, Bring DT Forum Back
"I neither know nor understand what happened later and why it deteriorated so much."

The Concordat and the teachers' union are what happened, guille. This, coupled with an underfunding of the public school system, and massification of it to the masses (more emphasis would be made into quantity of students vs. quality of the ones existing), was a recipe for disaster. The Concordat is really up there among Trujillo's long term mistakes, along with the nationalization of the electric system and his keeping up the haitianization of the sugar cane cutting that the Yanks implemented. If only he would have behaved in a contrary manner on the last two ((sigh)). :-(
Written by: dreadlocks, 17 Jan 2014 7:53 AM
From: United States
sorry to disappoint , G, but the problems of education in Latin America are the same ones in the DR, only to a slightly lesser degree. the entire education system in LA is woeful, and i am not sure that teachers from that region is the answer.
Written by: josean, 17 Jan 2014 8:37 AM
From: United States, Fighting the Dictatorship of the Narco PLD Mafia; Guillermo Moreno President 2016



The Concordat of June 16, 1954 was the nail in the coffin of Dominican Public Education.




Written by: Lautaro, 17 Jan 2014 8:46 AM
From: Dominican Republic, Bring DT Forum Back
That's why it gets to be imperative more and more every day to get rid of the clerical meddling, not only on that score, but on many other subjects of national life as well. And of course, to bring back the Hostosian system, with a few changes in order to mold it to the current times.
Written by: dreadlocks, 17 Jan 2014 9:56 AM
From: United States
Mr Lautaro, would you mind providing me with a link to some text regarding the effects of the Concordat on social life in the DR? is there any english version, perhaps?
Written by: Lautaro, 17 Jan 2014 10:09 AM
From: Dominican Republic, Bring DT Forum Back
Have yet to come with an English version, dread, but here's one source giving a general view about it:

//argeliatejada.blogspot.com/2010/11/el-concordato-trujillista-y-sus.html#!/2010/11/el-concordato-trujillista-y-sus.html
Written by: dreadlocks, 17 Jan 2014 10:12 AM
From: United States
thanks a lot, my friend
Written by: Lautaro, 17 Jan 2014 10:14 AM
From: Dominican Republic, Bring DT Forum Back
Any time, my friend. On another search, I found this, which could serve as a complement:

concordatwatch.eu/showsite.php?org_id=891
Written by: Radar, 17 Jan 2014 10:38 AM
From: Dominican Republic

I do believe that there's always an answer to any challenge. The sorry state of our educational system in place today, must change for the better, in a hurry.

It has always been the case that people migrate where there are opportunities for a better life. This includes job security with salaries that exceed basic living expenses (housing, food, medical, etc.).
This is why talented people emigrate to nations where they stand a better chance of a greater standard of living.

The DR can, if it decides to do so, (in spite of the teacher's union), certainly afford to hire abled professionals to undo and reform our educational dearth. ..If we can afford to spend billions on a subway system and other very expensive forms of infrastructure, we can, no doubt, pay foreigners to prosper our nation by prospering our children's minds.

It will take billions, but this is money well invested. It'll be interesting to see what the govt will do and how it'll accomplish this.
Written by: dreadlocks, 17 Jan 2014 1:44 PM
From: United States
Radar, i like your spirit, and you seem to be a well intentioned guy, but you must look at the realities. the DR education mess exists because of cultural issues, to a large degree. politics, patronage, nepotism, and other issues, have caused the morass. education was never a priority, because that is how the powers that be wanted it to remain. an educated populace asks too many questions. why do you need an education when Daddy Balaguer will give you what he thinks that you need?

if the DR brings in foreign teachers, and pays them 3 times what it pays locals, then the unions are going to demand parity, or there will be huelgas. if you give them the same salary as the foreigners get, there will be hyperinflation. then the other government servants are going to demand a raise.
Written by: Atabey, 17 Jan 2014 4:38 PM
From: United States, Bring DT Forum Back--


Dready,

It all depends on HOW the leadership goes about doing things. The Teacher's Union can be forced to accept a two tier system BUT ONLY IF those coming from aboard ARE TRULY well qualified. If they are well educated and do a decent job, then for a short period of time, UNTIL DR's own domestic teaching pool of candidates starts making the grade, these foreigners will greatly ensure that at least more of the children receive a better educational opportunity.

Your point about the awful state of education in LA is well founded as any reading from the two links above indicate. BTW, Spain has some of the LOWEST educational standards in Europe.

One policy that could have distinguished LF was that of achieving a breakthrough in education back during his first term in office when he opened relations with Cuba. Imagine IF LF had managed from Cuba a few thousand teachers to push along his party's educational platform? We could have sold Cuba food in exchange!

Written by: josean, 17 Jan 2014 5:50 PM
From: United States, Fighting the Dictatorship of the Narco PLD Mafia; Guillermo Moreno President 2016


"Imagine IF LF had managed from Cuba a few thousand teachers to push along his party's educational platform?"

Now he throws his NARCO GOD under the METRO!


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