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Santo Domingo.- Nearly 170 Haitians living in the Dominican Republic in irregular migratory status, especially in the area of Santiago, have returned voluntarily to Haiti, outlet haitilibre.com reports.

It said the International Organization for Migration (IOM), in coordination with the Dominican Government, helped vulnerable Haitian migrants to return to their home communities in the north of Haiti.

“Our compatriots in several buses and trucks carrying their belongings, crossed the bridge of Dajabón between the two countries at 10am, day of the binational market in the municipality,” the outlet reports.

"We are satisfied with the work that IOM done because it is making a great contribution to solving a problem that is becoming increasingly difficult due to the mass migration of undocumented Haitians in the neighboring republic," said the Director Lorenzo Paul of the relief organization and human rights in Haiti.

It said 129,000 Haitians in irregular migratory situation have already returned to Haiti between June 2015 and December 2015, either repatriated by authorities or voluntarily. “On average, for each Haitian repatriated by Dominican authorities, nearly 8 Haitians have chosen to return voluntarily to Haiti during that period.”

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COMMENTS
11 comment(s)
Written by: venganzaderafael, 7 Mar 2016 3:27 PM
From: United States
Something is something. Unfortunately parity in the back and forth migrations is still lopsided in favor of the incoming
crew. Let's not forget that for 6 years after the disastrous quake of 2010 the Haitians were coming thru the border at a 30,000 - 40,000 per month pace.
Written by: venganzaderafael, 7 Mar 2016 3:28 PM
From: United States
Something is something. Unfortunately parity in the back and forth migrations is still lopsided in favor of the incoming
crew. Let's not forget that for 6 years after the disastrous quake of 2010 the Haitians were coming thru the border at a 30,000 - 40,000 per month pace.
Written by: Radar, 7 Mar 2016 9:55 PM
From: United States, Aspen Hill, Maryland.

I feel sorry for these folks who, through no fault of their own, are forced to migrate in order to survive.
unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be much progress in Haiti to create sources of employment or to condition the land to grow much food.
Unless the international community goes in, in full force and works the land to be fruitful again, there will be much hunger and a renewed exodus to DR.
At the completion of the two energy plants in Punta Catalina, and others being build, we'll have a surge of investors manufacturing all kinds of stuff due to cheap labor and plentiful energy.
Employment will multiply and likely create a labor shortage. Not only in the manufacturing sector, but also in construction. I can foresee lots of tall office buildings popping up all over SD and Santiago.
It is well-known that Haitians are the true experts in construction. We'll need lots of these folks here for years to come. But, as a result of progress, we'll also get a tsunami of illegals.!
Written by: venganzaderafael, 8 Mar 2016 2:40 AM
From: United States
Great , to the air polluting effects of the antiquated coal powered plants let's be permissive to further carbonizing of our forests, contaminations of our rivers and overpopulating and trashing of our cities and towns. All in the name of progress.

Sounds like the coming of the Apocalypse.
Written by: Quovadis, 8 Mar 2016 3:19 PM
From: Dominican Republic
".....it is well known that Haitians are the true experts in construction"...

You've gotta be kidding, Radar!
Written by: Radar, 8 Mar 2016 6:06 PM
From: United States, Aspen Hill, Maryland.

Well, then. Tell me why over 80% of manual labor in the construction of high risers are Haitian nationals.?.. Yes, they're paid less than a Dominican, but as they gain experience, are more sough- after than any Dominican.
When I was in DR, the brother who contracted with the firm putting up the apartment building to do the plumbing, had me over the project just to see how he and his crew did their job. I can tell you that the only Dominicans, besides me and the brother were his partner and the two supervisors overseeing the project. Everyone else there was Haitian.
When I say "true experts", I'm talking about hard-working Haitian men (and women), who know what they're doing better than anyone else.!
Written by: guillermone, 10 Mar 2016 11:56 PM
From: United States, Bring Back DT Forum
n/a
Written by: guillermone, 10 Mar 2016 11:57 PM
From: United States, Bring Back DT Forum

An undocumented Haitian labor force a necessary evil......is it?

The US hires highly trained and well paid workers who are citizens or legal residents and it seems to work out find. I have never seen industry at verge of a collapsed as a result of that. And the same would be true for the DR. Dominican business continue to follow outdated business models, minimize expenses to obtain maximum profits but fail to invest in long term capital investments. This is never more true then the sugar cane industry were for decades progress remains stagnant and lags far behind the rest of the world. Instead of mechanization it prefers to use cheap manual labor imported from Haiti. We should follow Brazil. They have applied highly advanced farming methods in the sugar case industry and as a result salaries for workers are among the highest in the agricultural sector. Unless the DR makes drastic changes, we will continue to see the flood of illegal Haitians with costly consequences later
Written by: Radar, 11 Mar 2016 1:38 PM
From: United States, Aspen Hill, Maryland.

That's right, Guillermo. Mechanization is the key to lesser manual labor. Perhaps the bosses who own and run sugar mills will invest in modernizing its business.-- especially now that world prices have gone up for sugar and all its derivatives.
Unfortunately, cheap manual labor will continue to entice industry fat cats to keep hiring and making this international crisis worse.--what do they care.?
And I can tell you is gonna get worse.!... I can foresee a near future where investments will overwhelmed the available labor pool and force an illegal migration from all over the Caribbean and Central America...I kid you not.!
When we begin to grow our economy exponentially, the need for cheap and expert labor will create a mess like we've never seen before. I don't know what the solution is. -- perhaps there is none.!
I mean, DR would have to build a wall, purchase modern boats and planes to patrol our shores, etc...
But only if there's a political will. If not, nos jodimos.!!
Written by: guillermone, 11 Mar 2016 2:26 PM
From: United States, Bring Back DT Forum

...DR would have to build a wall, purchase modern boats and planes to patrol our shores, etc...
But only if there's a political will. If not, nos jodimos.!!-Radar
---
We need Trump for president, have him build a wall and let the Haitians pay for it. But where do we send the bill? Trump is full of hot hair, "mucha espuma y poco chocolate". Unfortunately people do fall for his empty promises. What he offers is nothing but political demagoguery and rhetoric. If the US the richest most powerful nation on earth has been unable to effectively stem the flow of illegals, what hope do we have for a country like the DR to do any better. The ironic thing is that either way the DR is screwed. If there is no economic progress people suffer and the opposite is also true. If prosperity continues to improve, Haitians or illegals from any country will risk their lives to get there and like you say, "will create a mess like we've never seen before" And I agree, Nos JODIMOS in capital letters
Written by: Radar, 11 Mar 2016 8:53 PM
From: United States, Aspen Hill, Maryland.

Presidential hopefuls in the US, same as DR, is a toss between who's worse.! I'm at a loss as to who'll do the least damage. I'll probably be wasting my vote with Clinton, the same as with Minou Tavares who seem the lesser of the evils.
Unfortunately it looks like Trump will be the next president, that is if Hillary can't muster the necessary votes. I'm disappointed with Abinader saying he'll stop the expansion of the Metro. That is an illogical move which will costs us billions more than building the remaining planned lines...

So we're screwed either way. I'm hoping Medina will continue his progressive policies and that his next term will lessen the outrageous thievery in government.

In reference to walls being built, that's extremely unlikely due to the costs involved. On the other hand, if a more serious effort is put into finding who's legal or not, the damage may not be as severe. But no matter what gets done, the same as in the US, it's a losing battle....Alas.!
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