Close Gallery
Surely Jàquez V. speaks for the "movement', Photo elnuevodiario.com.do
Zoom Picture

Santo Domingo.- In what can be catalogued as an event only possible in the Dominican Republic, the Prosecutors Dignity Movement on Wednesday vowed to escalate their struggle to obtain 1.44% of the government budget, by writing a bill to submit to Congress together with a group of judges.

Movement spokesperson Surely Jàquez said of the RD$8.8 billion the prosecutors should receive by law, they get only RD$3.3 billion, or 37 percent.

Jaquez said that prosecutors lack logistics to carry out their functions. "The prosecutors in the towns even have to buy reams of paper, and other expendable materials out of their own lowe wages and drive in their own vehicles as well as use their own computer."

In addition to prosecutors, some judged have also formed “unions,” although they are protected from being dismissed for such actions.

Share / Recommend this article: FacebookFacebook Digg thisDigg this del.icio.usdel.icio.us TechnoratiTechnorati YahooYahoo Facebook
COMMENTS
9 comment(s)
Written by: bernies, 2 Jul 2014 5:15 PM
From: Dominican Republic, Juan Dolio
Let me tell you what Judges and Prosecutors in the USA all judges and prosecutors except for the attorney general have drive their own cars to work and pay for the own gas and the are not given police officer to be their drivers.

So your demands are not the right ones. You should do a much more better job and stop demanding money from the people in order to prosecute someone that has committed a crime.

You bunch low lives that sell yourselves for even 500.00USD are not worth a pay raise.

You need to start doing a much more better job and then ask for a raise like every private employee do or they go somewhere else if they don't get it.

And that is all I have to say about your demand.
Written by: danny00, 2 Jul 2014 6:03 PM
From: United States, JPMORGAN INC. STOCK BROKER HO HO HO
dirty rotten scoundrels. every govt office in the country are robbing the cookie jar.
Written by: laman00, 2 Jul 2014 6:37 PM
From: United States, Los Angeles CA
not just them who cry for a raise, its in there culture anytime you hire someone to work for you within a week they ask for a raise make a big deal of the job he or she thats doing it, lazy asses, you put an add in a paper for employment they call you and hang up your suppose to call them back, once you call them they start with the transportation fees, food, blah blah blah, you have to provide all to keep them happy, and still they complain ungreatfull species...
Written by: lennoxnev, 2 Jul 2014 7:37 PM
From: United States Virgin Islands, DR
There are better prosecution services which are not linked to politics and ability to pay than the US model.

A national prosecution service independent of police ( - but offering advice on potential prosecutions - ) and politics is perhaps a better model for DR. Look at the CPS Crown Prosecution Service - a non ministerial government department in the UK as an example.

For a successful prosecution service you need motivated individuals who are free from interference by politicians and are a unified coherent and consistent organization across the country....a centralized body paid by central government and able to attract the best legal minds in their field.

The DR badly needs good and brave independent prosecutors
Written by: Ricardolito, 2 Jul 2014 8:53 PM
From: Dominican Republic, Zona Colonial
lennoxnev,unfortunately that is notthe way the system works here in the DR , But if you look at the Crown Prosecutos Office in the UK. the police do provide the office with the case history and the evidence and the Office decides whether any court hearing is likely to proceed But the office is still under the supervision of the attorney general and his off sider the solicitor general so it is still uner the control of a minister ,,has been for centuries ,But in general practice most cases are do not involve the attorney general .
But the big difference is that in England a case is presented by a certain prosecutor and in a court often there are many crown prosecutors presenting evidence in cases that they have been working on ,As you know in the big cases the crown will be represented by silk with a juniour assisting. Here you can go into many courts and the prosecutor will present evidence in more than 9 cases and up until that morning he knows nothing about any of them
Written by: Ricardolito, 2 Jul 2014 9:00 PM
From: Dominican Republic, Zona Colonial
Normally the fiscal presents a broad outline of the case and then the judge decides if the case has legs and if so he gives between 3 months and a year for the police to investigate the case . But before the case goes before the judge the prosecuting lawyer and the defence lawyer often have an agreement as to whether baail should be given to the accused,, There are new laws that forbid a judge giving bail in certain cases ,,but it seems the judges do not follow this law .
Then normally there is NO further investigation because the police/fiscal do not have the resources and so the prisoner just rots in prison...that is whay over 89% of prisoners have never been sentanced . When I was robbed I had to pay the police to go to San Juan where the culpprit had fled .. I am all in favour of giving the police modern resources and training so a case can be properly investigated and brought to a conclusion
Written by: laman00, 3 Jul 2014 2:50 AM
From: United States, Los Angeles CA
Whats up with these funny looking hats they have, do they differ from other lawyers around the worlld???
Written by: Ricardolito, 3 Jul 2014 9:05 AM
From: Dominican Republic, Zona Colonial
In many countries ,especially connected to english law the lawyers wear a black gown and a wig as does the judge but no hat ,unless the judge is about to announce a death sentance . It must be hot for the judiciary in Africa to wear a heavy wig . By the way I think the hats worn here are the same as in Italy
Written by: RoyStone, 4 Jul 2014 4:41 AM
From: Australia
Interesting that in such a sexist macho country, a very high proportion of the judges and prosecutors are women.

How is that so?
Post Your Comment | Not a member? Create your account | Lost your password?
Write your opinion here. Please keep your comment relevant to this article. Please note that any comments which contain offensive language or discriminatory expressions may be edited/removed.
You must log in to post a comment:
Username Password